Mental health has been historically swept under the rug, treated as something one simply overcomes by being positive. Unfortunately, the people that have suffered from these issues for centuries have found little to no support, but that is slowly changing with scientific and social recognition becoming more common.

Fortunately for myself, my parents noticed the abrupt change in my demeanor from the happy-go-lucky child I was to the constantly irritated, increasingly closed off high school student I became as well as the lack of interest I showed in my hobbies. My mother practically dragged me to a therapist, which culminated in a diagnosis of mild depression and an SSRI prescription that significantly improved my overall mood. There’s still an easily seen difference in how I engage with other people and my own interests when I’m not taking medication, but I have relatively easy access to help when I need it.

Although I have been lucky enough to have a support system to help me when I’m down as well as easily accessed healthcare professionals, people in our society have the opportunity to see many homeless individuals that don’t have the same privileges.

Although I have been lucky enough to have a support system to help me when I’m down as well as easily accessed healthcare professionals, people in our society have the opportunity to see many homeless individuals that don’t have the same privileges. In many cases, people that have mental health issues such as schizophrenia or depression either don’t have the means to see a professional for help, or their issues have become stigmatized by others around them and they don’t deal with their issues while they are still very manageable.